Avoid financial aid scams

This CNBC piece shares some good tips on how to avoid scams that purport to help you pay for college, including: Scholarship applications that come with a fee Seemingly exclusive invitations to workshops that in reality are open to everyone Seminars that promise better information than your high school counselor can give you For honest, reliable […]

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Does it have to be “crazy at work”?

When I started Collegewise, I had experience working in a small business, but not starting and running one. So I began a habit of reading business books. I wanted to fill the gaps in my knowledge, and I just found the topics interesting. Nineteen years and over 200 books later, none have impacted my approach to […]

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For waitlisted students

Imagine asking someone to the prom and getting this reply: “Hmmm…maybe. I want to go with you, but I also want to see who else might ask me. So I’ll get back to you. Full disclosure, I can’t promise when I’ll give you an answer, or if it will even be before the prom takes […]

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A free webinar for future STEM majors

If you’re considering pursuing a degree in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) and would like some advice about choosing the best path (and college) for you, I hope you’ll join us for the following free webinar. STEM’s Many Branches: Selecting Your STEM Major (And Getting In!)  Tuesday, April 17, 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. […]

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Promised peaks, occasional valleys

The problem of seemingly pervasive feelings of loneliness on college campuses is earning increasing concern from counselors and parents. Frank Bruni’s New York Times piece, “The Real Campus Scourge,” revealed a survey of 28,000 college students, 60 percent of whom said they had felt “very lonely” over the last 12 months. And Cornell University freshman […]

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What’s the harm in overparenting?

This 12-minute NPR piece with Julie Lythcott-Haims features interview clips as well as segments from a popular TED Talk, “What’s the harm in overparenting?” It’s well worth the listen for parents, and I thought one of the most important reminders came from a casual mention that wasn’t even the primary focus of the segment: “The […]

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Six tips to treat PowerPoint presentation pain

Counselors (and parents), if you’re planning on using PowerPoint for your next presentation, please consider Seth Godin’s six tips in his recent post, “Words on slides.” Not surprisingly, some of the very same tips are part of the recommended slide preparation for those delivering a TED Talk. If you’ve ever sat through a talk where the presenter […]

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Are you tired of college talk?

The process of getting into college dominates many families’ conversations. Progress in classes, test score check-ups, activities and honors, and the elusive edge to gain admission to the dream college—it’s no wonder that even many of the highest achieving teens seem to disengage from these conversations the longer they go on. If your family is […]

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How to evaluate your involvements

Too many students use the same metric to evaluate the ways they’re spending their time outside of class—will this look good to colleges? Most knowledgeable counselors—and colleges themselves—will tell you that this is the wrong metric to use and the wrong question to ask. There is no existing list of activities, hobbies, or other uses […]

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