Your style of play

I got a lot of nice feedback—from students, and from parents about their students—in response to my post about playing the game right. Having a deep passion for whatever you do, sports related or not, makes you a happier, more interesting, and more successful person. Soccer player Tobin Heath is a two-time Olympic gold medalist, a two-time Women’s […]

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Better for parents, too

I write often here about the dangers of overparenting, of doing for your kids what they can (and I would argue, should) do for themselves. Overparenting sends your student the message that you don’t have confidence in their abilities to succeed without you. It teaches them to sit back and wait for Mom or Dad […]

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The pre-judgment problem

Seth Godin’s recent post, “Our pre-judgment problem,” shares several examples of how people and organizations use the wrong metrics to judge people, including: The SAT is a poor indicator of college performance, but most colleges use it anyway. Famous colleges aren’t correlated with lifetime success or happiness, but we push our kids to seek them out. […]

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Take the “good” out

If you were to strike the word “good” from your vocabulary, your evaluation of colleges would be a lot more precise. And a lot more honest. It’s a good college. They have good professors. It’s got a good pre-med program. Take out the “good” and start over. Now what are you going to say? Don’t cheat […]

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Great benefits…and great writing

Zapier, an 8o-person startup that automates workflow between different applications, just started offering a “de-location package” for new employees in which they’ll reimburse up to $10,000 to help new hires currently living in the San Francisco Bay area relocate. To anywhere. The initiative is innovative (it’s gotten some press). It makes sense for Zapier (they’re a […]

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What’s this about “front-loading?”

The Chicago Tribune recently ran “Decision time approaches for college applicants,” which included this important reminder for families as you compare financial aid awards: “Be sure to read the fine print in the [financial aid] offer. Does the school promise that the awards will be renewed as long as you maintain acceptable grades? According to […]

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A short shelf life

My wife and I are completing an application for our son’s admission to preschool. That is a sentence I never imagined I would write, but I’m following my own advice about matchmaking. It’s not a prestigious preschool (if there is such a thing), and they don’t make ridiculous claims about preparing toddlers for future Ivy […]

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Tough private counseling love

At many of the counseling and admissions conferences we attend, at least one session will degenerate into a small contingent of private counselors who voice complaints that high school counselors: don’t appreciate what we do are biased against us should be more open to collaboration, like taking our phone calls, communicating with us about our […]

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