You know the list

At my first job out of college, a colleague gave me an invaluable tip. Our boss ended each day by writing a list of things he wanted to check in with us about the following day to make sure we were on track with our work. He’d leave that list on his desk as he […]

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Just one more thing

My four-year-old has discovered the stall tactic–some version of which many kids embrace growing up—“Just one more thing.” Whatever undesirable task we lay in front of him, from putting on shoes, to heading to bed, to cleaning his room, there’s always “just one more thing” he instantly has decided must be accomplished before addressing the task at […]

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If you have a micromanaging parent

I write often here about the risks and effects of overparenting. When a parent assumes a role that’s part manager, part agent, and part personal assistant on behalf of their kid, the student loses all opportunities to learn by doing and to assume agency for their own life and education. Naturally, most of those posts […]

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Regularly ask “why?”

In response to my post last week with data demonstrating why teens need to get more sleep, a parent replied with an earnest and totally reasonable question: How? As she pointed out, getting the recommended 8 hours of sleep is a challenge with school, classes, activities, part-time jobs, etc. For a concerned parent who agrees […]

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A guide to basic financial aid terms

It’s helpful for students just starting their college search to understand how financial aid works. Without that knowledge, you risk making faulty assumptions about which schools you can and cannot afford, how much aid will be available, and when to apply for it. I always appreciate when a knowledgeable source makes a complex idea easier […]

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Love it, or just good at it?

Sometimes we’re good at things that we don’t actually love doing. As you progress through high school, how can you tell if you really love an activity, class, project, etc., as opposed to just being good at it? Here are three questions to consider: Do you look forward to it, or try to put it […]

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Act as if you need something

I loved Seth Godin’s recent post that asked: “That meeting on your calendar, the one scheduled for tomorrow. What if it were the final interview for a job you care about?” That litmus test—showing up with the same posture as if we were asking for something important—can change your approach to a lot of things. […]

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Passive early, active late

In financial investing, an active investor is one who’s hands-on, frequently adjusting their strategy and their asset allocation based on market trends. They buy and sell repeatedly in an effort to beat the stock market average. The passive investor, on the other hand, plays the long game. They’re not trying to predict the market’s next […]

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2 minutes a day, for 21 days

Want to feel happier, more socially connected, and more grateful for the good in your life? All it takes is 2 minutes a day for 21 days to notice a dramatic difference. From author, former Harvard instructor, and positive psychology expert Shawn Achor: “The simplest thing you can do [to feel happier and more positive] […]

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Our kids need more sleep

From Challenge Success’s regular newsletter, which arrived in my inbox this week: “Research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that not getting enough sleep is associated with certain health risks and that more than ⅔ of U.S. high school students report less than 8 hours of sleep during school nights. When […]

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