Admissions negativity getting you down?

In many social circles, pressure surrounding college admissions causes a pervasive negativity. Lamenting weaknesses rather than leveraging strengths, bemoaning the selectivity of one school instead of celebrating the accessibility of so many others, treating the journey like an escalating arms race instead of an exciting time in a student’s life—it’s no wonder so many families […]

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Interested in creating a podcast?

High school students, would you be interested in an internship that culminates with you creating your own 30-episode podcast about a topic you care about? If so, consider applying to Seth Godin’s summer internship, “The Podcast Fellowship.” It’s designed for college students, but I don’t see why that should stop you from applying. Take a […]

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To do better work in less time, stop multitasking

Eric Barker’s latest post, “This Is How To Increase Your Attention Span: 5 Secrets From Neuroscience,” shares key findings described in The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High-Tech World. Here are three worth paying attention to, particularly if you’re a student or adult looking to do better work in less time. People who think they are […]

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Feelings fade, but the internet doesn’t

Yesterday, a student who had been denied from a highly selective college responded by tweeting at the school’s dean of admissions, hurling rage and insults at him that depending on your interpretation were at best offensive and at worst racist (the icing on the Twitter cake was that the post was also rife with spelling […]

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Planning your courses? Join us for a free webinar!

Just about every college in the country will tell applicants that high school course selection is one of the most important factors in determining admissibility to college. But how many AP or honors classes should you take? Is it important to take four years of science, language, or math? And what if you’re debating between […]

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Financial aid and divorced parents

Some of the most common questions parents ask during our financial aid seminars are around divorce. Are both parents responsible to pay for college? How will schools evaluate financial need if a parent refuses to contribute? Do responsibilities change if a parent remarries? If you’ve got similar questions, Mark Kantrowitz delivers a good primer on […]

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What’s left in, and what’s left out

The Gallup Organization broke new ground when they released First, Break all the Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently. Rather than set out to prove a management hypothesis, their researches spent a decade interviewing employees and managers to seek data-driven proof of what the world’s greatest managers had in common. And the most […]

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