It’s all going to be OK

Parents watching kids go through the college admissions process already know how the story ends. You don’t know the specifics yet. You don’t know which colleges will say yes or if your kid will hit it off with their future roommate. You don’t know what job your student will hold after college, where they’ll live, […]

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Of course it matters where you go

“It’s not where you go to college, it’s what you do while you’re there.” I say it in different ways, but the overarching message is always the same. I believe that principle. It’s why I started Collegewise and why I am still here 19 years later. But the message has never been, “Just pick any […]

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On the benefits of sleep

The research keeps piling up on the benefits of enough (and the harms of the lack of) sleep, for both teens and adults. Here’s a good summary from the Washington Post, “Our brains benefit from sleep. Here’s why, and how parents can help teens get plenty of it.”

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The old-fashioned way

AT-AT

When I was 8, I got the most coveted item on my Christmas wish list—a Star Wars AT-AT. But the box depicted a number of action-figure accessories that turned out not to be included, like various backpacks and climbing ropes and laser pistols. I felt ripped off, duped by false advertising. So I found the only […]

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Private counselors: What’s on your “No” list?

Private counselors, like many professionals that deal with clients, often end up accepting whatever customers—and their associated behaviors—that come their way. This is especially true when you’ve got financial responsibilities at home and additional expenses at work, like office rent, insurance, or salaries for your employees. But as difficult as it might be to do, […]

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Misplaced pronoun

One pronoun often gets in the way of a healthy college admissions process—“we.” Parents who say, “We’re applying to…” or “We are still waiting for a decision from…” are forgetting that all of this college admissions activity and anxiety isn’t happening to them. It’s happening to their kids. And too much “we” just puts more […]

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Updating your FAFSA

If you’ve submitted your FAFSA and need to make corrections or updates, here’s a good how-to. The earlier you update it, the better chance your schools will use the correct information in determining your aid package, and the less work you’ll need to do contacting schools in the future to submit aid appeals based on […]

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Time on your collective hands

If you could make your regular meetings for your counseling office, student club, or parent organization more enjoyable, and do so without reducing the quality of the decisions reached, would you be interested? If so, shorten the meetings. New research shows that even shortening a 1-hour meeting to just 50 minutes can make a difference […]

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What is college for?

All this college preparation, all the associated anxiety, all the information-seeking and financial planning and candidacy strengthening that’s so ingrained in today’s families, it might make sense to stop occasionally and ask, “What is college for?” More specifically, what is college for for you? Is it so you can get a good job after college? Is […]

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Failure statements

If you don’t put any effort into a class–you don’t participate, complete assignments, or study for the big exam–and you fail, you’ve made one kind of statement with that failure. But when it comes to something that might not work—leading a fundraiser, trying out for the team, producing a musical in your community, etc.—if you really […]

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