Is the sacrifice worth it?

The New York Times reports that the most popular class at Yale is “Psyc 157, Psychology and the Good Life.” This semester, 1200 students, more than one quarter of Yale’s undergraduate population, were enrolled in the class, which promises to teach students how to lead happier, more satisfying lives. Why is the class so popular? […]

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Five fruitless college admissions tactics

After helping more than 10,000 students navigate the college admissions process, our counselors have an informed sense of what works and what doesn’t work when helping students get where they want to go. And we’ve noticed that some families spend a disproportionate amount of time focusing on strategies that almost never work. Here are five […]

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Five steps to easing college stress in your house

The stress surrounding the college admissions process can worm its way into areas of your life where it has no business. That’s one reason I’ve heard so many families comment that college talk has ruined their dinner table conversations. Parents, here are five deceptively simple things you can start doing this week that will ease […]

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Juniors, what do those emails from colleges mean?

If you ever needed an example of just how much colleges are driven to market themselves in the hopes of driving up their application volume, look no further than “search letters” (a term coined before colleges upgraded to email marketing). If you’re a junior who took the PSAT and you checked the box indicating that […]

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Try moderation?

Most things considered good for you can be done in moderation, excess, or not at all. Doctors will tell you that regular exercise will lengthen your life, while spending the majority of your time on the couch will shorten it. But most would also agree that running a marathon once a week is best reserved for […]

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Acting as your own manager

High school students may not be intrigued by the headline “Why People Really Quit Their Jobs.” But this article reveals that adults frequently quit their place of work when their jobs aren’t enjoyable, their strengths aren’t being used, or they just aren’t growing in the form of learning, mastery, career progress, etc. And it shares […]

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Friend, manager, or agent?

When someone shares a struggle, complaint, or frustration, we make the choice whether to respond like a friend, a manager, or an agent. A good friend is there to listen without judgment. A friend says, “That sounds really frustrating. I’m so sorry.” A good manager is there to help find, but not necessarily produce, an […]

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Progress reporting

I began writing today’s blog post about the article “When did being an average student become a bad thing?” “Average” is often a pejorative term in our culture, nowhere more so than for college-bound high school students. It was shaping up to be a reassuring reminder that we don’t need our kids relentlessly achieving in all […]

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Do less and obsess

Morten Hansen, management professor at UC Berkeley, just released his new book, Great at Work: How Top Performers Do Less, Work Better, and Achieve More. This clip of his interview with Dan Pink is just one minute long, but he shares one of the vital secrets he writes about in the book—top performers “do less and […]

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