50 things…

Here are fifty things you can do in college, even if the school isn't a famous one. 

  1. Eat late night pizza in the dorms.
  2. Take road trips.
  3. Play intramural basketball games.  At midnight.
  4. Choose classes you want to take.
  5. See how many straight nights you can eat spaghetti.
  6. Be a resident advisor in the dorms.
  7. Do research in physics with a professor.
  8. Meet your future husband or wife.
  9. Meet the person who will one day be your maid of honor or best man.
  10. Paint your face in the school's colors for the big game.
  11. Have a professor who tells you that she sees great potential in your work.
  12. Enjoy late night conversations with your new friends in the dorm.
  13. Create memories with your friends that will make you smile when you're fifty.
  14. Write for the campus newspaper.
  15. Sit with a professor during her office hours and realize you're chatting with the person who wrote the textbook you're using in class.
  16. Play mud football games on Sundays.
  17. Study abroad in Italy.  Or Greece.  Or Australia. 
  18. Pull an all nighter studying with your friends.
  19. Go to parties.  Good ones.
  20. Participate in campus traditions.
  21. Sing (obscene) songs to your college's rival at the homecoming game.
  22. Work a part-time job at the campus coffee shop, or the library, or at the restaurant in town.
  23. Discover your academic passions.
  24. Play in the school's marching band.
  25. Participate in the engineering Olympics.
  26. Feel like you're getting a little smarter every day.
  27. Realize that you are actually excited to attend your classes.
  28. Leave everything you didn't like about high school behind.
  29. Go on a camping trip with your new friends.
  30. Find an internship in a career that looks interesting.
  31. Meet mentors who will help you reach your potential.
  32. Celebrate the end of finals week with your fellow students.
  33. Take a class that has absolutely nothing to do with your major just because it looks interesting.
  34. Go to the school's football games.  Or the basketball games.  Or the hockey games.
  35. Spend Thanksgiving with a friend's family because they live closer to campus.
  36. Camp out to get basketball tickets.
  37. Eat Top Ramen, or cereal, or peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for dinner.
  38. Write a senior thesis on a subject you get to pick.
  39. Spend your summer getting career experience in an area you find interesting.
  40. Study in the park.  In between Frisbee tossing.
  41. Excel academically and enjoy what you're learning.
  42. Make the kind of friends you know will be in your life for a very long time.
  43. Do community service with your college friends.
  44. Find your natural talents and interests.
  45. Discover what you want to do with your life.
  46. Do things that, one day, your kids won't be able to imagine mom or dad doing.
  47. Join a fraternity or sorority.
  48. Participate in an outdoor education program.
  49. Graduate and marvel at how far you've come, how much you've grown, and how much you've learned over the last four years.
  50. See how proud your parents are at your graduation.

How many of those are actually factored into the US News College rankings?

When rejection is a good thing

Highly-selective colleges are always going to be picky.  They receive applications from the most qualified students from around
the world.  And almost everyone who applies gets rejected (about 10-15 out of
every 100 applicants gets in).  That's not going to change.

So you can lament that your test scores aren't high enough or that you don't have
enough AP classes or that you haven't yet achieved statewide or nationwide or worldwide acclaim
for one of your activities. 

Or you can reject that thinking.  You can reject the idea that not being good
enough to get into an Ivy League school equates to just not being good enough at all.  Reject the idea that your
admissibility to Duke is a measure of your worth.  Just reject it.
  

Instead, embrace the idea that hundreds of colleges will almost certainly
take you exactly as you are.  

The wisdom and merits of exploring less visible colleges

I once did a seminar about how to choose colleges, and while trying to make the point that you shouldn't apply to a school just because it's famous, I turned to a student in the audience and asked,

"Would you ask someone to marry you just because she was good looking and rich?"

The kid didn't even break a smile and answered, "Probably." 

I do love a teenager's honesty. 

Maybe Marty O'Connell, Executive Director of Colleges That Change Lives will have better luck with that analogy when teens read her article about the wisdom and merits of selecting less visible colleges.   

Colleges that Change Lives

Ctcl picMarketing author Seth Godin recently published a recommended reading list on his blog.  And I was happy to see one of our favorites show up–even happier to hear his take:

"The more you learn about the industry of marketing colleges, the more
skeptical you'll become of the $150,000 famous school degree. Every
high school parent in America should read this book."

If you're intrigued, check out:

Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About Colleges by Lauren Pope



Elite Colleges Don’t Make Elite People

Where did your heroes go to college? 

That's a question posed by Jay Mathews of The Washington Post in this article.  You might be surprised where many past presidents, state governors, Fortune 500 CEOs and other people who have achieved great success did–and did not–go to college. 

Here's my favorite part:

"Researchers Stacy Berg Dale and Alan Krueger found that admirable character traits — persistence, imagination, energy — produce success in life no matter which college a person attends.  So relax. Be happy about your chance to spend four years at any school, soaking up the wisdom of the world and deciding what kind of life you want. Those of you who become heroes will discover most of the qualities that made you so were already in your possession"

I knew that both Steve Jobs and Bill Gates dropped out of college (Reed College and Harvard, respectively), but I didn't know that Ted Turner was kicked out of college.  Twice.