The wisdom and merits of exploring less visible colleges

I once did a seminar about how to choose colleges, and while trying to make the point that you shouldn't apply to a school just because it's famous, I turned to a student in the audience and asked,

"Would you ask someone to marry you just because she was good looking and rich?"

The kid didn't even break a smile and answered, "Probably." 

I do love a teenager's honesty. 

Maybe Marty O'Connell, Executive Director of Colleges That Change Lives will have better luck with that analogy when teens read her article about the wisdom and merits of selecting less visible colleges.   

Colleges that Change Lives

Ctcl picMarketing author Seth Godin recently published a recommended reading list on his blog.  And I was happy to see one of our favorites show up–even happier to hear his take:

"The more you learn about the industry of marketing colleges, the more
skeptical you'll become of the $150,000 famous school degree. Every
high school parent in America should read this book."

If you're intrigued, check out:

Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About Colleges by Lauren Pope



Elite Colleges Don’t Make Elite People

Where did your heroes go to college? 

That's a question posed by Jay Mathews of The Washington Post in this article.  You might be surprised where many past presidents, state governors, Fortune 500 CEOs and other people who have achieved great success did–and did not–go to college. 

Here's my favorite part:

"Researchers Stacy Berg Dale and Alan Krueger found that admirable character traits — persistence, imagination, energy — produce success in life no matter which college a person attends.  So relax. Be happy about your chance to spend four years at any school, soaking up the wisdom of the world and deciding what kind of life you want. Those of you who become heroes will discover most of the qualities that made you so were already in your possession"

I knew that both Steve Jobs and Bill Gates dropped out of college (Reed College and Harvard, respectively), but I didn't know that Ted Turner was kicked out of college.  Twice.