Will you stay for the story?

Startups get a lot of attention in the press. The vision, the big ideas, the risk—it makes for good headlines and memorable stories. But a startup isn’t a business. It’s the start of a business. And starting a business isn’t nearly as difficult as executing your idea, keeping your promises, and staying in business.

Activities in college admissions work the same way.

Many students want to highlight the startup-style headline on their college applications. They proudly list that they “started a club,” “founded a non-profit,” “or “launched a fundraiser.” But colleges know to look for evidence of the story that follows the start. If your club only held one meeting, if your non-profit exists in the paperwork alone, if the fundraiser never actually raised funds, your startup story doesn’t have the same impact.

I’m not discounting the value of initiative (I’ve written about its importance before). And I’m not suggesting that colleges will only appreciate what you start based on how you finish. In fact, there’s a lot you can learn from trying your best to execute something that didn’t work. But even learning that lesson will require that you do more than just start.

So yes, if you’ve got an idea, if you see a need you can fill, if you’ve got the gumption to take the lead and the risk, then start, found, launch, etc.

But if your only motivation is to list the start on your college application, you might consider redirecting your time and attention to something where you’d be excited to stay for the story.