Five ways to make a great impression on college interviewers before you meet them

You start to make an impression on your college interviewer before you ever sit down and answer your first question.  Here are five ways to make that impression a good one.

1.  Relax.

A lot of students panic when their interviewer first contacts them to schedule the interview.  Relax.  Nerves ruin conversations.  And you're not going to say anything that will destroy your chances of getting into college.  I'm not suggesting you should refer to your interviewer as "Dude" on the phone, (there's a difference between being relaxed and being disrespectful).  But if you can just be yourself, the interviewer will probably look forward to meeting you even more than she was before.

2. Be genuinely appreciative.

College interviewers deserve to be thanked (most are volunteer alumns who aren't getting paid to do this).  So why not lead with that and say, "Oh, thanks so much for calling"?  Or you could start your email reply with, "Thanks so much for getting in touch with me."   It's surprising how many students neglect to do this.

3. If you receive a voicemail or an email, return it promptly.

I've heard several college interviewers tell stories about leaving voicemails or sending emails to kids who don't respond for 3 or 4 days.  That doesn't send a very good message to your interviewer.  I'm not saying you need to be on high alert and respond within 15 minutes.  But during the college admissions process, it's a good idea to check (and reply) to your email at least once a day.  And if you get a voicemail from an interviewer, return it the same day if you can.

4.  Be excited about this opportunity.

Interviewers don't have enough power to torpedo your chances of admission unless you really do something stupid like admit how much you like to beat people up.  So be excited about it.  A college interview is a great thing.  You're going to sit with someone whose only agenda is to learn more about you and answer any questions you have about the school.   If the interviewer can hear in your voice that you are excited about the opportunity to meet, it's a validation of your engagement in the process.

5.  Say thank you.

I know I already told you to be genuinely appreciative, but it can't hurt for me (or for you) to say it again.  Thank the interviewer at the beginning and at the end.